Nine Billion Names God Essay

Nine Billion Names God Essay-60
Not a relic of lunar civilization, the artifact, half the age of Earth, was left by visitors: Wilson imagines it saying “I’m a stranger here myself.” After its destruction, he “guesses” it must have been a beacon; interrupting its signal has triggered a “fire alarm.” Lacking explicit alien intent, the pyramid emblemizes the unknown.Although such a potentially multivalent symbol invites other interpretations, Wilson’s is supported by being exposed to sunlight.& there is no line between art / religion / science & all are to be aesthetically pure / ritually powerful / based on practical truth to enhance human life & there is a moral here somewhere i am sure of it & growing up i never foresaw myself being a religious person & that was because i did not understand what god really meant & this is not a man floating in space judging us / god is art / music / nine billion other names we use to survive & thrive & there is a hindu term: namaste & it means the reflection of god in me honors & respects the reflection of god in you & a lot of people use that only for people which makes sense though i challenge you to apply it to the other facets of your life / to search for god living in all things of this universe.

Not a relic of lunar civilization, the artifact, half the age of Earth, was left by visitors: Wilson imagines it saying “I’m a stranger here myself.” After its destruction, he “guesses” it must have been a beacon; interrupting its signal has triggered a “fire alarm.” Lacking explicit alien intent, the pyramid emblemizes the unknown.

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Campbell, Jr., the story’s humor, style, and forecasts are vintage Clarke. ,” it opens, setting the context of a paternalistic “Galactic Federation,” sending a ship to rescue a few hundred survivors from Earth before its sun turns into a nova.Directing its course to the receiving point of a communications array on Earth, the mile-long spaceship, now needing rescue itself, approaches rendezvous with an unexpected fleet of ships from the planet.Unprecedented in size, this fleet of “primitive” rockets demonstrates an acceleration of man’s technological development so astonishing that the captain, the tentacled Alveron, whose ancient people are “Lords of the Universe,” teasingly suggests the vast Federation beware of these upstarts.His 1967 collection of his “favorites” represents many facets of his career, from the raconteur of tall tales and ghost stories to the fantasist, the sentimentalist, the realist, and the poet of wonder.Most of his best and best-known stories are included, from the haunting rite of passage of a young lunar exile getting his first glimpse of the unapproachably radioactive world of his ancestors (“‘If I Forget Thee, Oh Earth ,’”) to such “alien fables” of technological complacency as “Superiority” and “Before Eden.” “Rescue Party” Among them, “Rescue Party,” his second professionally published story, looks forward to other tales of human progress and alien contact, but it is unusual in its strong story line and alien viewpoint.From such homey touches, he led the climb to “Wilson’s Folly,” a plateau artificially leveled for a twelve-foot crystal pyramid “machine.” Its force field gave way, after twenty years of frustrated investigation, to an atomic assault which reduced the mystery to fragments.The rest of the story is speculation, successive stages of Wilson’s inferences.The engineers plan is the flee Tibet right before the lists completion so they're not around when the world doesn't end.Right before they get on the plan to leave, at the time of the lists completion, they look up, and notice the stars beginning to disappear.The matter-of-fact description of the marvelous of H. Wells, the poetic evocation of unknown places of Lord Dunsany, and the immense vistas of space and time of the philosopher Olaf Stapledon lie cheek-by-jowl with artificial suspense devices, awkward sentimentality, schoolboy silliness, and melodramatic manipulation of such hoary motifs as the “stranded astronaut” or the “end of the world” in his less distinguished fiction.At its best, however, Clarke’s work shows glimpses of man’s rise to interplanetary civilization or evokes the wonder, in suitably subdued tones, of his confrontation with extraterrestrial intelligences.

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