Essays For Of Mice And Men Loneliness

Essays For Of Mice And Men Loneliness-80
He shows his loneliness when Lennie is talking to him in Crooks’s room. Later on in the novella, Candy enters Crooks’ room to talk to Lennie, and he says to Crooks: “’I been here a long time. ‘ Crooks said darkly, ‘Guys don’t come in a colored man’s room very much’” (Steinbeck 75).Crooks is telling Lennie about how it feels to be black and how excluded and isolated he feels: “’Books ain’t no good. When Steinbeck uses the word “darkly” to describe how Crooks replies to Candy’s innocent comment, it reveals to the reader that Crooks feels very irritated and angered due to his isolation from others.

He shows his loneliness when Lennie is talking to him in Crooks’s room. Later on in the novella, Candy enters Crooks’ room to talk to Lennie, and he says to Crooks: “’I been here a long time. ‘ Crooks said darkly, ‘Guys don’t come in a colored man’s room very much’” (Steinbeck 75).Crooks is telling Lennie about how it feels to be black and how excluded and isolated he feels: “’Books ain’t no good. When Steinbeck uses the word “darkly” to describe how Crooks replies to Candy’s innocent comment, it reveals to the reader that Crooks feels very irritated and angered due to his isolation from others.

When she finally does find someone she can talk to, she mainly talks about how she hates the ranch because nobody ever talks to her. When alone with Lennie, she again reveals her deep loneliness: “Why can’t I talk to you? In Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck suggests that there is a deeper meaning to being lonely than just the superficial sense of loneliness.

Another favorite topic of hers is to talk about how lonely she is all of the time. This loneliness can be portrayed through Crooks, Candy, and Curley’s Wife, all in different ways.

This is portrayed through Crooks, Candy, and Curley’s Wife. Additionally, he does not want to just read books by himself at night; he would rather be talking to someone who will listen to him.

Crooks portrays the feeling of loneliness through his rejection from society due to his skin color and through his cantankerous ways when others try to reach out to him. Furthermore, Crooks does not want to be isolated and excluded from the rest of the workers because of his skin color; he wants to be included and not have to sleep in his own, separate room.

He is talking to George and Lennie about how lonely he is without his one, true companion in life, his dog, and how he now has no friends.

Because of his old age and having only one hand, he knows that he will not be able to get anymore jobs, and he worries that he will never find a another friend after his dog’s death. His only company, his faithful, old, and blind dog, is willingly taken from him and killed; Candy fears that he will be treated the same way in the future and therefore, wants to join Lennie and George on the ranch. She had wanted to become a movie star but never got the chance.She is also avoided because she always causes trouble and brings commotion among the workers and Candy.He is also lonely because he doesn't have someone on the same level with who he can interact.Moreover, Crooks presents the theme of loneliness because he is always by himself in his room. For someone to be lonely, it means that he or she is solitary and do not have any companions.Loneliness can be caused by many different types of discrimination.In summary, Crooks shows his loneliness through his cantankerous mood and through his feeling of segregation from others due to his skin color.In a similar way, Candy also feels isolated and disconnected from the others, and although his feeling of seclusion is not as deeply set as Crooks’ is, Candy’s is similar in a way that he feels as though he has no one he can talk to or trust.He is telling George this in hopes that George will let him stay with Lennie and him when they get their own house. Later on in the novella, Candy says in desperation, “I’d make a will an’ leave my share to you guys in case I kick off, ’cause I ain’t got no relatives or nothing” (Steinbeck 59).

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